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20110301
20110331
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
and tsunami, a desperate search for food, water and missing loved ones. and on the u.s. west coast, fears of radiation results in a run on potassium iodide. but is there really cause for concern? captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. japan is dealing tonight with the aftermath of one catastrophe while trying to prevent another. we'll have much more about the earthquake and tsunami in a moment. the official death toll is nearly 3,400. but first, the nuclear crisis. radiation continues to leak from damaged nuclear reactors in fukushima, 140 miles north of tokyo. an estimated 50 workers are still trying desperately to cool them to prevent a meltdown. in the meantime, 70,000 people have been evacuated from an area within 12 miles of the dai-ichi plant and 140,000 more living within 120 miles of the facility have been told to stay inside. japan has imposed a no-fly zone over that area for commercial air traffic. the white house, meanwhile, says the u.s. is not calling on ame
traffic. the white house, meanwhile, says the u.s. is not calling on americans to leave tokyo because of radiation concerns. and u.s. officials say it's unlikely dangerous levels of radiation will reach hawaii or the u.s. mainland. we have extensive coverage of the disaster in japan beginning with harry smith on the nuclear crisis. >> reporter: after a day of sharp spikes, radiation levels at the earthquake stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear plant are said to be falling. this morning there are reports of a new fire at the plant. people throughout japan are on edge. >> ( translated ): they say we are safe but it makes me wonder. it is really safe? >> reporter: japan's prime minister, naoto kan, tried to reassure his country but he said more radiation leaks are likely and ordered those in the danger zone to seal themselves indoors. american sean scisle says his plan is to get out while he can. >> last night we packed bags in case of an emergency and, you know, just better safe than sorry. we're probably going to be getting out of fukushima prefecture either late tonight or early tomorr
ruled yemen for 32 years. he is a key u.s. ally in the fight against al qaeda. meanwhile, president obama plans to speak to the nation monday night about libya to explain why he ordered u.s. military action and give an update on the operation. today french and british jets struck libyan artillery and tanks near ajdabiya. smoke could be seen miles away. late today, rebels began a new push to retake the city. and libyan state television showed damage from overnight air strikes in tripoli. nato, which is taking over control of enforcing the no-fly zone, said it's planning for a mission that would last three months. as other nations play a larger role, the u.s. is publicly taking a step back, but it's a small step. more on that from david martin at the pentagon. >> reporter: this is what the battle for libya looks like to a pilot. it's a british pilot attacking a libyan tank. but more than half the 96 strike missions in the past 24 hours were american. and so were all 16 of the tomahawk cruise missiles fired overnight. despite the announcement that nato would soon be taking command of t
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)